My home page and little bit about me.

Some More Pitbull Trivia and old pitbull photos with famous people

Home
# 1 My Pitbulls and Photos & pedigrees of dogs I own today.
.Pretty Boy Floyd at Stud $1000. Two small pups for sale for $500 each.
Friends with pups from my bloodline of dogs for sale.
Some Laws & theories about dogfighting.
Some of the dogs I fought 1960's 70' 80's History #2 & dogs fought out of my dogs.
Many New Arrest. These dogfighters families suffer more than any dogs when arrested.
Some top Bred Patterdale Terriers.
Weldon Stockton's Page Also Bennett Clayton.
(Joseph) Joe Corvino & Floyd Merriman story
Some History J. Williams, B. De Cordova & More & Light'in Billy.. #3
Some Pitbull history # 4
EARL TUDOR & JIMMY WIMBERLY PAGE # 5
Earl Tudor PAGE #6
John P. Colby, Family and dogs. Page # 7
Some old timers- George C. Armitage-Al Brown-George Saddler Page # 8
Lonzo Pratt and some Zebo talk.
Don Mayfield and some dogs he owned & some he Borrowed Page # 10
Floyd Boudreaux one of the Best dogmen of my era. Page # 11
More Floyd Boudreaux Bullyson,Eli Jr. ,Zebo comparison. Page12
Danny Burton Page 13
Walter Komosinski Page14
Bert Clouse Page 15
Howard Heinzl page 16
Ralph Greenwood Page 17
Clyde Mason page 18
Bobby Hall Page 19
Maurice Carver Page 20
Lots of top dog men. A1
Lots of top dogmen A2
Lots of top dogmen A3
Rick Halliburton and Marty Reed & Dick Harp. Page 21
Donald Lee Maloney Page 22
Gary J. Hammonds page 23
Robert L. Neblett Page 24
Cecil Collins Page 25
Oklahoma dogmen in the early days page 26
George Gilman Page 27
William J. Lightner Page and Norman Hooten with Butcherboy. 28.
Clemmons & Elliott page 29
Wolves Attack Pitbulls on chains in Yugoslavia. See what happened
Building a Breeding Stand and a forever Swivel.
Some old Pedigrees
Some friends I've met through my Pitbull Era and my family.
Why do pitbulls all have a different level of gameness?
Why do people fight dogs.
What I think about Pedigrees online.
Unjust facts about pitbulls and dogfighters.
Politics and a USDA & Health Department Warning.
.Cajun Rules By Gaboon Trahan
Links
Some of the dogs I liked from the 60's-70's and 80's
My Friends from other Countries..
Interesting History Concerning children and Pitbulls
Some More Pitbull Trivia and old pitbull photos with famous people
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Wow is spot on! This is the story of The Little Rascals, "Petey"

Petey, or Lucenay's Peter (his United Kennel Club registered name) was whelped September 6th, 1929. He was bred by A.A. Keller, and owned/trained by Harry Lucenay. Petey was put into films at around six months. He is the son of Pal, The Wonder Dog -- a dog owned by Petey's trainer, Harry Lucenay. Pal was actually the first dog to appear regularly in OG shorts. Pal's screen credits include 13 feature films released from Dec. 1921 to Oct. 1927.

Petey was signed in 1927 to a three-year contract with six month options. His starting salary was $125 per week, which would be raised in increments of $25 per week to make him exclusive to Hal Roach Studios -- making him the second highest paid actor in the OG series (next to Farina).

The first Pete was poisoned by an unknown assailant. His last film was A Tough Winter. One of his offsprint carried on beginning with the next film, Pups Is Pups. Pete's real name was "Pal," and he was owned and trained by Harry Lucenay. The distinctive circle around his eye was originally unplanned. When the spunky pit bull made his "Our Gang" debut, a circle had been painted around his eye and would not come off. It made sense to keep it there - it made him stand out. That circle often migrates between the right and left eye from film to film. This was obviously a dog with a lot of tricks! However, if the truth be known, there were other Petey's that were used as standins for some stunts and other duties, like close-ups.

Pete first got his break in show business in the 1920s when he took over Pal's(his dad) place in the Buster Brown silent movies. The Buster Brown director, Hal Roach, went on to direct Pete in the Our Gang comedies. Infamous for the ring around his left eye and his funny antics, Pete quickly stole the show. Daintily attired Buster found himself in innocuous misadventures along side his faithful canine companion, Tige. (Petey to you and me!) Unlike Our Gang, the series was obviously aimed at very young audiences and offered very little for adults. I have no doubt that youngsters were thoroughly entertained by Buster Brown, however it seems strange watching our most popular Little Rascal elsewhere, but he is well-trained and skillfully shows off his abilities with Buster Brown.

Pete's last appearance was in "A Tough Winter", released June 21, 1930. "He was poisoned, probably by someone with a grudge against Harry Lucenay. The OG kids were inconsolable upon learning of Pete's death. But since Lucenay was breeding a "Pete" line, he was able to substitute one of Pete's descendants. The second Pete has the circle on the opposite eye and the ears and front legs have a slightly different coloring. The second Pete only stayed at Roach Studios for two years, because Lucenay was fired.

The last 'true Pete' OG comedy (meaning Pete #1 and his son) was "The Pooch" (1932). All subsequent Pete's were from an entirely different bloodline. After leaving Roach, Pete (#2) went to NY, and appeared in the Fatty Arbuckle short "Buzzin' Around" and in Paramount's "Broadway Highlights" newsreel, in which he is seen drinking a mug of beer as his initiation into The Lambs Club. In 1936, he once again joined OG, but only for a personal appearance tour.
in the Our Gang comedies. Infamous for the ring around his left coloring. The second Pete only stayed at Roach Studios for two years, because Lucenay was fired.

The last 'true Pete' OG comedy (meaning Pete #1 and his son) was "The Pooch" (1932). All subsequent Pete's were from an entirely different bloodline. After leaving Roach, Pete (#2) went to NY, and appeared in the Fatty Arbuckle short "Buzzin' Around" and in Paramount's "Broadway Highlights" newsreel, in which he is seen drinking a mug of beer as his initiation into The Lambs Club. In 1936, he once again joined OG, but only for a personal appearance tour.
Edit Text

Pete the Pup
"He was a gentle, playful and warm dog. He would sleep at the foot of my bed. He was just the regular family dog. I really miss him." -Harry Lucenay

Petey Little Rascals

Petey Little Rascals

Petey, or Lucenay's Peter (his United Kennel Club registered name) was whelped September 6th, 1929. He was bred by A.A. Keller, and owned/trained by Harry Lucenay.

Pete the Pup in Buster Brown

The first Pete was poisoned by an unknown assailant. His last film was A Tough Winter. One of his offsprint carried on beginning with the next film, Pups Is Pups. Currently lives in Dog Heaven.

Pete's real name was "Pal," and he was owned and trained by Harry Lucenary. The distinctive circle around his eye was originally unplanned. When the spunky pit bull made his "Our Gang" debut, a circle had been painted around his eye and would not come off.

Petey Little Rascals Petey in Buster Brown
(mid 1920's)

Petey Little Rascals

It made sense to keep it there - it made him stand out. That circle often migrates between the right and left eye from film to film. This was obviously a dog with a lot of tricks! However, if the truth be known, there were other Petey's that were used as standins for some stunts and other duties, like close-ups.

And we all thought our lovable Petey was loyal only to the Little Rascals. Not quite! Before he signed on with Hal Roach Studios as America's favorite pooch, he appeared in a series of "Buster Brown" comedies which were sort-of low rent Our Gang films.

Daintily attired Buster found himself in innocuous misadventures along side his faithful canine companion, Tige. (Petey to you and me!) Unlike Our Gang, the series was obviously aimed at very young audiences and offered very little for adults. I have no doubt that youngsters were thoroughly entertained by Buster Brown, however.

Petey Little Rascals

It seems strange watching our most popular Little Rascal elsewhere, but he is well-trained and skillfully shows off his abilities with Buster Brown. These pictures are from "Look Out Buster" in which Tige is being hunted by dog catchers for quarantine, and ends up foiling a gang of robbers in the process. Was Petey warming up for one of his best roles in "The Pooch" several years later? Perhaps, but without the pathos of Stymie and the charm of baby Spanky, "Look Out Buster" ends up being a pretty average evade-the-dog-catcher comedy.

Petey Little Rascals

Petey's Film Career
From Cult Movies magazine

Petey was put into films at around six months. He is the son of Pal, The Wonder Dog -- a dog owned by Petey's trainer, Harry Lucenay. Pal was actually the first dog to appear regularly in OG shorts. Pal's screen credits include 13 feature films released from Dec. 1921 to
Oct. 1927.

Petey landed the role of 'Tige' in the Buster Brown comedies. It was the role of "Tige" which has been attributed to Pete acquiring his classic ring around the eye. The ring was made with permanent dye, so Roach had no choice but to accept Petey the way he was.

Petey was signed in 1927 to a three-year contract with six month options. His starting salary was $125 per week, which would be raised in increments of $25 per week to make him exclusive to Hal Roach Studios -- making him the second highest paid actor in the OG series (next to Farina). Pete's last appearance was in "A Tough Winter",
released June 21, 1930.

He was poisoned, probably by someone with a grudge against Harry Lucenay. The OG kids were inconsolable upon learning of Pete's death. But since Lucenay was breeding a "Pete" line, he was able to substitute one of Pete's descendants. The second Pete has the circle on the opposite eye and the ears and front legs have a slightly
different coloring. The seconds Pete only stayed at Roach Studios for two years, because Lucenay was fired.

The last 'true Pete' OG comedy (meaning Pete #1 and his son) was "The Pooch" (1932). All subsequent Pete's were from an entirely different bloodline. After leaving Roach, Pete (#2) went to NY, and appeared in the Fatty Arbuckle short "Buzzin' Around" and in Paramount's "Broadway Highlights" newsreel, in which he is seen drinking a mug of beer as his initiation into The Lambs Club. In 1936, he once again joined OG, but only for a personal appearance tour."

Rick R. - Our Gang Online


Petey Little Rascals

Petey's Legend

By CHRISTINA MINOR
Tribune-Herald staff writer

His dog represents a bygone era � the days of silent movies and vaudeville. But the memory of the American bull terrier still lives on in the hearts of many Americans, as well as former owner Ted Lucenay of Robinson.

Pete, the canine comedian from the Our Gang movies, still receives attention although he's been gone for more than 60 years. A quick search of the Internet confirms the continued interest of the Our Gang stars, with special mention of Pete, and numerous Web sites have been devoted to the group.

Movie rental stores, such as Blockbuster and Hollywood Video still receive enough interest to carry the classic comedies and the newer versions. Younger residents might remember the Little Rascals , the name that replaced Our Gang . The newer movies had a different dog playing Pete.

Petey Little Rascals

Petey Little Rascals

Lucenay is regularly bombarded with requests for pictures and information about his beloved animal. Museums have contacted him, and the Waco-McLennan County Library also wanted information for a display.

Helen Lucenay, Ted's wife, said the interest in Pete comes and goes.

"When the movies were brought back on television, people would call for a story or want Ted to send them a picture," she said. "I don't think Ted minds. This is something that's a part of him."

Although Lucenay is used to the attention, Pete was more than a celebrity to him. He was a best friend.

"He was a gentle, playful and warm dog," Lucenay said. "He would sleep at the foot of my bed. He was just the regular family dog. I really miss him."

Lucenay was a young boy growing up in California when Pete was alive. When the pair would go for walks, people would stop Lucenay and Pete, so they could have their picture taken with the dog.

"He was always recognized," Lucenay said. "Everybody loved him."

To further publicize the lovable pup, Lucenay's father, Harry Lucenay, would take Pete to the Steel Pier in Atlantic City for fans to meet him and pose for pictures with him.

Pete first got his break in show business in the 1920s when he took over Pal's � his dad � place in the Buster Brown silent movies. The Buster Brown director, Hal Roach, went on to direct Pete in the Our Gang comedies. Infamous for the ring around his left eye and his funny antics, Pete quickly stole the show.

And now, as his legend carries on, people are wondering what happened to the remains of the Tinseltown dog. Pete died in 1946, when Lucenay was 18. Lucenay joined the Army and after his discharge, settled in the Waco area in the 1950s when he married Helen.

According to e-mails from roadsideamerica.com, Pete has sparked numerous rumors concerning his whereabouts. One reference mentions Pete was poisoned, leading to his demise. Another reference mentions cemeteries where Pete could be buried.

But, Lucenay said, none of the rumors are true. Pete died of old age, not poison. And the final resting place of the famous pup � that secret remains with Lucenay.

Petey Little Rascals

But the one thing for certain, the black ring around Pete's left eye was not the work of a makeup artist. The natural skin coloration was such an oddity that it became certified by Ripley's Believe It or Not.

When asked about the rumors and information circulating about Pete, Lucenay responded, "There's always going to be something out there. And in today's world, anything's possible."

Pedigree for Lucenay's Peter

Sire
Tudor's Black Jack

Sire
Tudor's Black Tige

Sire
Blue Mike

Sire
Wichita Mike

Dam
Miss Blue

Dam
Lady Lee

Sire
Nemo

Dam
Juda
Dam
Blackwell Mollie-W
Sire
Swineford King Paddy
Sire
Delihant Paddy
Dam
Swineford Duchess
Dam
Billie Burke
Sire
Swineford King Paddy

Dam
Swineford Angry Aggie*

Dam
Peggy O'Neill

Sire

Sire

Sire

Dam

Dam

Sire

Dam
Dam
Sire

Sire

Dam

PR LUCENAY'S PETER
OFFSPRING SIBLINGS PEDSTATS PRINTER FRIENDLY
BREEDER: A. A. KELLER
OWNER: HARRY LUCENAY
REGISTRATION #: U.K.C. 022-558
SEX: MALE
COLOR: BLUE BRINDLE & WHITE
BIRTHDATE: 1929-09-06
POSTED: 2002-11-11
LAST MODIFIED: 2006-08-01
PEDIGREE HAS BEEN SEEN: 8228 TIMES

Pete the Pup from the Little Rascals tv show.

4 GENERATION PEDIGREE
First Second Third Fourth
(Sire) PR BLACK JACK BRUCE'S BATTLE JR BRUCE'S BATTLE (12XW) TIGE OF JAXON
PINCHER'S GYPSY (GYPSIE)
BRUCE'S PET BRUCE'S PAT
BRUCE'S SNOWBALL
KINKADE'S BREEZIE BRUCE'S MAJOR BRUCE'S BATTLE (12XW)
BRUCE'S BEAUTY
ANDERSON'S DIXIE BRUCE'S DUFFY
TUPMAN'S QUEEN SPADES
(Dam) PR KELLER'S PEGGY O'NEIL PR BUDDY BOY II PR JACK DEMPSEY III SMITH'S WILD FIRE BILLY
KLASSEN'S TOPSY
PR PAL WICHITA JAMIESON'S JOKER
SAWHILL'S LADY
PR KELLER'S MITZI MISTER MIKE JAMIESON'S JOKER
BEAUTY -H-
LADY BETSY SMITH'S PRIVATE PETE
BRINDLE BEAUTY
Who would have thought one of the greatest pitdogs of this world. Would sire a famous Pitbull Movie star that would be running and playing with children.

 The History of Dogfighting

Dogs have been the unwitting victims of exploitation for blood sports since ancient Roman times when they fought against other animals in the Coliseum. The practice of pitting dogs against other animals, such as bulls and bears, continued through medieval times in England until it was outlawed in 1835 by the Parliament in the Humane Act of 1835.

                        Around that time, the Staffordshire Bull terrier was developed and modern dog-fighting was born. The dog was brought to America in 1817 and dogfighting became part of American culture. The “sport” was endorsed by the United Kennel Club, which actually formulated rules and sanctioned referees. Although dogfighting had become illegal in most states by the 1860’s, it continued to flourish as an American pastime through the early twentieth century. It was so popular in fact that in 1881 the Ohio and Mississippi railroads advertised special fares to a dog-fight in Louisville between Lloyd’s Pilot, owned by ‘Cockney Charlie' Lloyd and Crib, owned by Louis Krieger. [9] Public forums such as Kit Burns’ Tavern, “The Sportsman’s Hall” at 273 Water Street in Manhattan, regularly hosted matches and the sadistic culture became immortalized in the annals of American history and folklore.

      By the 1960’s and 1970’s, the blood sport had been driven further underground as high profile organizations such as the United Kennel Club withdrew their endorsement. Although dogfighting was outlawed in all the states by 1976, it did not begin to receive serious law enforcement attention until recently. By all accounts, dogfighting continues to surreptitiously thrive in America; its prosperity due in large part to the chronic apathy of and denial by the legal system. Today, it is a felony in 50 states as well as the District of Colombia, the Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico.

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Jessica Alba
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Petey
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There are several Petey dogs .One is a son to Tudor's Blackjack.

Rachel Ray and her pitbull.
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Brad Pitt
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Beleive it or not another photo of Brad Pitt.
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The famous Chris Brown
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Rachel Bilson
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Tia Marie Torres feom theTV Parolees show.
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Some very famous people with Pitbulls as family Pets.

Jack Dempsey
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President Jimmy Carter
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Photo of Jessica Alba
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Fiona Apple
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Linda Blair
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Shorty Rossi
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Veronica Mars
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Silence Reigns when Japan's Tosas Fight

There is no noise, not even a growl, and no betting, either, at Japan's perfectly legal dogfights. And the big, well-mannered Tosa dogs bred for the fighting ring seem to like it that way

There are 25,000 registered fighting dogs in Japan, where dogfighting is still legal, although a growing body of humanitarians wants to outlaw it. Japan's dogfight fans include doctors, lawyers, farmers, miners, laborers and even company executives, but their interest is less in the outcome than in the sport itself. Strangly enough, for a country that has mastered the art of miniaturization, the Japanese fighting dog, known as the Tosa, is rather large. The Japanese say he is a descendant of the old English mastiff, a massive beast that sometimes weighed as much as 200 pounds.

This is an article from the Jan. 30, 1967 issue

Japanese tradition has it that the modern Tosa originated in the 17th century, when an English frigate struck a reef in Tosa Bay on the eastern side of Shikoku, the smallest of the four Japanese home islands. The Japanese of that distant day were not noted for their hospitality and what became of the captain and crew of the ship was never recorded. But in the wreckage of the frigate, according to the legend, the Japanese found a huge, brown dog, whose instinct as a fighter led him to defeat all the best local dogs.

Records were kept of this dog's bloodline. Through the years, the original Tosa strain was mixed with blood from the akita, a strong draft dog from northern Japan similar to a Siberian husky, the English bulldog and the English pointer. The English pointer cross produced a sprinkling of white, which persists today in the dainty white stockings often seen on a modern Tosa. However, the Tosa district is no longer the chief breeding area for the fighting dogs, which are bred all over Japan, many close to Tokyo.

The modern Tosa is still large; one recent champion weighed in at 154 pounds. This is heavier than the average fighting Tosa, whose weight is closer to 90 pounds. The Tosa often has the black muzzle of the English mastiff and is usually fawn in color. A chunky dog, 26 to 30 inches at the shoulder, with a full but not barreled chest and a powerful jaw, the Tosa has none of the sculptured musculature of a boxer or the statuesque tenseness of a Doberman pinscher. He is rather a shambling, rugged, not unfriendly fellow with the solid hulk of a football tackle.

Outside the fighting ring, the Tosa has the phlegmatic temperament of most massive dogs. Don't trouble him and he won't trouble you. He is surprisingly tolerant of smaller dogs, as long as they remain respectful. And, as with many working breeds, the Tosa functions better when not subjected to cuddling, petting and other demonstrations of human affection. Tosa owners are unanimous in believing that too much affection makes a dog less capable of achieving and holding a fighting edge. Few Tosas are treated as family pets, and most are housed in large wooden cages. Perhaps because of this, they tend to be one-man dogs.

Tosas are trained to be fighters, but they are carefully kept away from serious combat with other dogs until they are at least 1 years old. At that age, a Tosa will fight older, retired dogs for short periods of time, to develop his confidence and teach him the technique of fighting. Because the Japanese consider a silent dogfight more satisfying esthetically than a noisy one, Tosas must learn to fight without making a sound. If a young dog growls while fighting, he is reprimanded but is still encouraged to continue the fight. This lends an eerie quality to the contests, like the silence that prevails when Siamese fighting fish are battling to the death.

The dogs fight on a raised wooden platform covered with old carpeting in an octagonal ring, 15 feet wide. The dog owners and three referees perch around it during the fight, while the audience sits slightly below, as at a boxing match.

The Japanese, with their love of rank and ceremony, have designated three championship grades: Yokozuna, Ozeki and Sekiwake—the same ranks used in classifying Sumo wrestling champions. The rules vary for different classes. In the championship classes, the dogs are allowed one minute of grace, during which they may growl or whine without forfeiting the match. The newer, unranked dogs are allowed two minutes of preparation time. Once this period is over, if either dog makes the slightest sound he will lose the match. Several matches are stopped during every tournament, when alert judges hear a sound the audience does not.

The time limit for a match is 30 minutes, but they rarely go the limit. If both dogs are on their feet fighting to the end, each is credited with a win. If excessive bleeding occurs, if one dog establishes immediate superiority over another or if one dog is unwilling to fight, the match is halted.

After a particularly hard exchange, the judges will often stop the fight to look the dogs over. If a dog sits down from exhaustion, he must regain his feet within three minutes or lose. Tosas will sometimes lean on each other, ribs pounding, paws thrown over their opponent's shoulders, and ignore the cries of their owners and the crowd to mix it up. If one dog begins fighting within three minutes and the other does not, the non-fighter loses. Experienced dogs seem to fight by the rules, resting periodically before starting in again.

The Japanese fans' attitude toward dogfighting is best understood when one realizes there is no gambling or betting. Tosas are fought strictly for sport, and when a judge stops a fight, his decision is never protested.

The atmosphere of a Japanese dogfight is like that of a family picnic. Men bring their wives and children, sit on straw mats and enjoy the spectacle. After the matches, owners bathe their dogs, dress them in the championship belt and robe proper to their status and parade them in front of the crowd. Silver loving cups, championship trophies and flags are presented to both winners and losers. Many bows and congratulations are exchanged and much good-humored chaffing goes on between the owners. Challenges are called as the crowd applauds the official announcement of a dog's victory or promotion to a higher championship class.

At the last prefectural (countywide) tournament in Ito, 70 miles south of Tokyo, a famous local champion suddenly refused to fight. His owner, wearing the heavy plus fours, two-toed cloth boots and English cap of the Japanese worker on a holiday, leaped into the ring to explain that his dog was nervous in front of such a large crowd. The owner tipped his cap and bowed low in four directions before leading his peace-loving dog away to wild applause.

Those in favor of the sport point out. that a Tosa has never been killed or crippled in a fight. A veterinarian is always present and his decision to stop a fight, like that of the referee, is never protested. Legal dogfighting in Japan is vastly different from the illegal sport conducted on remote farms in the United States by gamblers and coarse-grained owners. The Japanese sincerely believe their gigantic dogs enjoy the matches.

"Their tails wag as they fight, thus do they not fight with pleasure?" an old man asked me.

PHOTOAFTER MATCHES THE FIGHTING DOGS, LIKE SUMO WRESTLERS, ARE GARBED IN THE CEREMONIAL ROBES INDICATIVE OF THEIR RANKS

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Helen Keller
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Billie Holiday
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Jessica Biel
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Sallie Civil war Mascott Monument
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The popular Jesse James
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Michial J. Fox
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Kaley Cuoco
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Josh Hutcherson
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John Stewart
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Steve and Terri Irwin
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